Link to Owner Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr.

FONT

MORE STORIES


Three coats of paint transform downtown metal entry art, which was installed by an artist in 2015, from pink to two-tone green

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: RAY PITZ - Two filbert tree sculptures that greet residents to Tigards downtown area received three fresh coats of paint this month. The artwork was created by artist Brian Borrello in 2015. Those two pink gateway sculptures of hazelnuts that greet visitors on both ends of Tigard's Main Street got a shot in the arm two weeks ago with a new color scheme and fresh coats of paint.

The pieces, named "Corylus" after the scientific name for the hazelnut or filbert tree, went from pink to a two-tone light green on the exterior and a light pinkish-white in the interior.

Artist Brian Borrello, who created and installed the sculptures in 2015, completed the repainting job last week, according to city officials.

"The final cost for repainting the sculptures was $9,860," said Lauren Scott, Tigard's community engagement coordinator. "He painted each with three coats of paint."

After the pink paint on the sculptures showed signs of fading earlier this year, a subcommittee of the Town Center Advisory Commission discussed the possibility of repainting them using color schemes different from the original color.

The subcommittee preferred the selected two-tone scheme because it added depth, especially to the interior of the pieces. It also resembles more closely the blossom of a hazelnut, a tree the city used to be filled with, and was more "eye-catching" from Highway 99W, officials reported.

In May, the full membership of the Town Center Advisory Commission signed off on the choice, with the Town Center Development Agency Board and the Tigard City Council giving the colors a thumbs-up as well in July.

"During the mayoral campaign last year, I frequently heard concerns about the color of our downtown gateway art," said Tigard Mayor Jason Snider. "I am glad our community was able to work with the artist over the last nine months to find a color scheme that more of our community can embrace."


Quality local journalism takes time and money, which comes, in part, from paying readers. If you enjoy articles like this one, please consider supporting us.
(It costs just a few cents a day.)

Go to top
Template by JoomlaShine