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Monthly book recommendations for kids and adults courtesy of the Woodburn Public Library

PreK-K-3

COURTESY PHOTO - Nobody Hugs a CactusNobody Hugs a Cactus by Carter Goodrich — Hank is the prickliest cactus in the entire world. He sits in a pot in a window that faces the empty desert, which is just how he likes it. He doesn't like noise, he doesn't like rowdiness, and definitely does not like hugs.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Dear BoyDear Boy by Paris Rosenthal and Jason Rosenthal — An open love letter to the special boy in your life. Boys, too, need a gentle reminder that they are cool, clever, compassionate, and one of a kind.

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COURTESY PHOTO - No Place Like HomeNo Place Like Home by Ronojoy Ghosh — Young children will delight in this fun, inviting story about discovering where you really belong.

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COURTESY PHOTO - The Little GuysThe Little Guys by Vera Brosgol — The Little Guys might be small, but they aim to be mighty. As they head off to find breakfast, they can conquer anything through teamwork‚ cross deep waters, dig through obstacles, and climb the tallest trees. Nothing can stop them!

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COURTESY PHOTO - Waiting for Chicken SmithWaiting for Chicken Smith by David Mackintosh — A story about childhood friendships, anticipation, and the magic moments that arise while you're waiting for something else to happen.

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Grade 3-6

COURTESY PHOTO - GlitchGlitch by Sarah Graley — From comics rising star Sarah Graley, a fresh and funny middle-grade graphic novel featuring a girl who must save a virtual world... and her own!

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COURTESY PHOTO - Enter the MinePopular MMOs: Enter the Mine by Pat and Jen — Pat and Jen need to free their friends, figure out who's behind this evil plot, and find a way to get back home — before it's too late.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Rocks and MineralsAbsolute Expert: Rocks and Minerals by Ruth Strother — From amethysts and tanzanite to the sparkling geodes and erupting volcanoes, get the latest geological insights and intel straight from the field from National Geographic explorer and geophysicist Dr. Sarah Stamps.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Diary of an Awesome Friendly KidDiary of an Awesome Friendly Kid by Jeff Kinney — It is finally time for readers to hear directly from Rowley in a journal of his own. In this book, Rowley writes about his experiences and agrees to play the role of biographer for Greg along the way.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Justice LeagueJustice League: The Ultimate Guide by Landry Q. Walker — A must-have for fans, this book showcases major in-world events in the Justice League's pulsating story, spanning nearly 60 years of comic book history, and is packed with info on the team's allies, enemies, bases, origins, and more.

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Teens

COURTESY PHOTO - The Music of What HappensThe Music of What Happens by Bill Konigsberg — Thrown together by chance in the sweltering Arizona summer, two opposite teens find common ground while working on a food truck. Max is a popular gay kid into sports, working out, and hanging out with his "dude bros." Jordan is quiet, into poetry, and spends his time with his two "wives." He has never been kissed, but hopes to find his Mr. Right. Both boys realize they have one thing in common, painful secrets. Topics of race, class, privilege, homophobia, toxic masculinity, toxic parents, and rape culture are told through these two boys' stories.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Tell Me EverythingTell Me Everything by Sarah Enni — A story about art, love, and social media. Ivy is a shy, artsy sophomore at Belfry High with only one close friend, Harold, and her photography. When Harold involves himself in other activities, Ivy is left on her own. She becomes involved with a new art-sharing app called VEIL, and realizes many of her classmates are a part of it and divulging their secrets. Ivy soon begins to suspect Harold is keeping a big secret, as well, and her good intentions to help goes catastrophically wrong. Suddenly finding herself in the spotlight, she must now make a decision to come forth with her own secrets or risk losing everything and everyone she loves.

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COURTESY PHOTO - The Year I Didn't EatThe Year I Didn't Eat by Samuel Pollen — A year in the life of 14-year-old Max, who battles anorexia. The only person he can turn to is Ana, aka anorexia. Not only does he write her letters in a journal, he also speaks to her inside of his head. Max's brother gives him a geocache for Christmas, and he hides his journal with it. But it disappears! In its place is a letter from "E." Who is "E?" Is it the new girl at school? Will his eating disorder take over his life and drive him further away from those who love him? Written with detail and raw emotion, Tell Me Everything gives a very real account of battling an eating disorder.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Tin HeartTin Heart by Shivaun Plozza — Marlowe is no longer the "Dying Girl" after being given a second chance at life with a heart transplant. She is now, for the first time, forced to consider what her life may be like as an adult. While adjusting to this new version of herself, she begins obsessing about the anonymous heart donor. Marlowe's zany vegan mom, costume-wearing little brother, and crush on the butcher's apprentice only add to her already complicated life. Will she be able to navigate this new reality and move on?

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COURTESY PHOTO - Girls With Sharp SticksGirls with Sharp Sticks ( Girls with Sharp Sticks #1 ) by Suzanne Young — At Innovations Academy girls are taught manners, modesty, and gardening. Each night they are given "vitamins" and forced to undergo impulse control therapy to curb any mischievous behaviors. One student, Mena, begins to question their controlled existence after one of the students disappears. Will the girls be able to uncover the truth behind the school's true motives?

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COURTESY PHOTO - XL by Scott BrownXL by Scott Brown — Will Daughtry has been small his entire life, and he is bitter! Most of his life he has felt overlooked and alone. He finds comfort in his best friend, Drew, and their friend Monica, a girl he has been secretly pining for since the fifth grade. When events take a sharp turn for the worse, he hits an all-time low. Suddenly, Will begins to grow, and FAST! He finds happiness in his new stature and feels that people see him differently. However, with this new growth comes new challenges. Will he be able to navigate this new life without his ego growing too large?

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COURTESY PHOTO - Life SucksLife Sucks: How to Deal with the Way Life Is, Was, and Always Will Be Unfair by Michael and Sarah Bennet — Being a teenager can really suck. Maneuvering changing bodies, home life, friendships, and school can be painful and embarrassing. Are you looking for honest and real life advice on how to navigate the teen years? Father-daughter team Michael and Sarah Bennett approach troublesome topics that come up during these difficult years, while helping readers realize it is ok for parents and their teens to discuss uncomfortable issues.

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Adult Fiction

COURTESY PHOTO - The Lost ManThe Lost Man by Jane Harper — In the remote Australian outback, Nathan Bright discovers the corpse of his middle brother, Cameron, by the stockman's gravestone, a macabre landmark. Cameron's Land Cruiser was packed full of water and supplies, and yet he died alone and dehydrated some nine miles away from it. It could be a bizarre suicide, but Nathan doesn't think so. Deeply atmospheric and character-driven, this thriller is a stand-alone novel from the author of The Dry and Force of Nature, about the long-term repercussions of family.

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COURTESY PHOTO - When You Read ThisWhen You Read This by Mary Adkins — Iris Massey worked with Smith Simonyi on PR projects for four years, and after her untimely death at 33 years old thanks to a terminal illness, Smith feels adrift without his friend and colleague. But Iris leaves him a project: she spent her last six months blogging sharp and funny musings about dying, and she wants Smith to get her posts published as a book. But in order to do so, he has to get approval from Iris' older sister Jade, a chef who is suffering the loss of her sister in her own way. Written in the form of a myriad of e-mails, blog posts, text messages, legal correspondence, and other virtual snippets, and by turns both funny and tragic, this is a beautiful story of how we handle loss.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Stranger Things: Suspicious MindsStranger Things: Suspicious Minds by Gwenda Bond — The third season of the hit television series Stranger Things is set to hit Netflix on July 4, and after you've binge-watched all the episodes, if you're still craving more weirdness out of Hawkins, Indiana, this prequel novel has got you covered. Exploring the truth behind what happened to Eleven's mother and the sinister MKUltra experiments at the Hawkins National Laboratory, this book will help ease the wait for the announcement of a fourth season.

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COURTESY PHOTO - The Hunting PartyThe Hunting Party by Lucy Foley — For 10 years, a group of friends from Oxford (now in their thirties) have been meeting to welcome in the New Year, in a tradition that started when they were students. This year they've chosen an idyllic - and isolated - estate in the Scottish Highlands. They arrive on December 30, just in time for a historic blizzard to seal them off from the outside world... and two days later, on New Year's Day, one of them is dead. A decade's worth of resentments and secrets have become too much to bear in this psychological suspense murder mystery that channels the classic feeling of an Agatha Christie novel.

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COURTESY PHOTO - We Must Be BraveWe Must Be Brave by Frances Liardet — Southampton, England is being evacuated in December 1940 and newlywed Ellen Parr discovers a small child asleep on the backseat of an empty bus. No one knows who Pamela is. For three years Ellen cares for the little girl as World War II rages on, until one day, Pamela is taken away from her, screaming. Ellen always told her older husband that she didn't want children, but as she returns to her quiet village life without Pamela, she finds herself devastated by the loss. Moving backwards and forwards in time between Ellen's childhood, 1940 Southampton, and the future, this is a slower-paced but emotionally resonant work of historical fiction.

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COURTESY PHOTO - The Priory of the Orange TreeThe Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon — Game of Thrones might be over on HBO, but while you're waiting for the sixth and seventh books to be released, Samantha Shannon has written a long epic fantasy that will satisfy your craving for more fantasy (and dragons). Featuring a diverse cast of strong female characters, including secret mages and dragon-riders, this epic fantasy novel features warring realms, a queen desperate to conceive a daughter to ensure her family's succession, and the return of the evil Nameless One from the Abyss, where it was banished generations ago. Best of all, it's a standalone tale, so you won't be left wondering what happens next at the end.

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Adult Non-Fiction

COURTESY PHOTO - Vietnamese Food Any DayVietnamese Food Any Day: Simple Recipes for True, Fresh Flavors by Andrea Nguyen — In the hot days of summer, the fresh and vibrant flavors of Vietnamese food are a perfect fit, and Andrea Nguyen has the aspiring cook covered in this beautifully photographed cookbook. Aware that not everyone is lucky enough to have an Asian grocery store in the neighborhood, Nguyen makes suggestions for substituting ingredients so you don't have to try to hunt down exotic ingredients. With recipes for perennial favorites like spicy garlic chicken wings and pho, as well as some fun fusion items like No-Churn Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream, this is a wonderful introduction to Vietnamese food for the novice cook.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Walking PortlandWalking Portland: 33 Tours of Stumptown's Funky Neighborhoods, Historic Landmarks, Park Trails, Farmers Markets, and Brewpubs by Becky Ohlsen — The warmer weather presents a chance to explore Portland without getting drenched in the process, and local author Becky Ohlsen has provided a wealth of options that show off the Rose City's hidden gems: gardens, historic landmarks, oddball shops, warehouse galleries, graveyards, and more. Each of the 33 walks included features full-color photographs, neighborhood maps, and information on public transportation and parking, to make braving the city easier. With fun trivia to impress your walking companions, and recommendations on restaurants and coffee shops so you can stay fortified on your urban adventures, this is a useful guide for anyone spending a day in Portland.

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COURTESY PHOTO - How to DisappearHow to Disappear: Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency by Akiko Busch — In a world where social media is king and we're encouraged to reveal, share, and self-promote in ever increasing levels, Busch explores the concept of disappearing, which has never been more enchanting — or difficult. She explores remote places like the Cayman Islands and Iceland, tries virtual reality goggles that trick the wearer into thinking their body had disappeared, and examines representations of invisibility in literature, cinema, myth, and more. A thoughtful work that encourages readers to consider the concept of privacy in a world focused on surveillance and publicity.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Dinner for EveryoneDinner for Everyone: 100 Iconic Dishes Made 3 Ways — Easy, Vegan, or Perfect for Company by Mark Bittman — Mark Bittman, the writer behind How to Cook Everything, is at it again with this handy cookbook that provides three different versions of 100 essential main dishes: an easy version (stovetop burgers), a vegan version (beet and lentil burgers), and an all-out version (ultimate cheeseburgers with tomato chutney), making it simple to pick a recipe that fits your mood, experience level, occasion, or time constraint. With lots of full-color photographs and an emphasis on fresh ingredients, efficient cooking techniques, and basic equipment, it's easy to decide what's for dinner.

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COURTESY PHOTO - Ten CaesarsTen Caesars: Roman Emperors from Augustus to Constantine by Barry Strauss — Strauss covers an exhilarating three and a half centuries of the Roman Empire, from its rise with founder Augustus through its Christian conversion and move east to Constantinople with Constantine, in this condensed history. Ten Caesars strikes a comfortable balance between being informative without becoming too convoluted or dry, and is an excellent introduction to Roman history for readers without much previous knowledge. The emperors chosen are Augustus, Tiberius, Nero, Vespasian, Trajan, Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, Septimius Severus, Diocletian and Constantine, but Strauss doesn't neglect to mention those who came between.


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