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Woodburn Independent readers write in regarding non-profit donation, cigarette taxes

Thank you for donation

The Woodburn Family Learning Center wishes to thank Doug and Juan of Imperial Gardens for delivering 22 yards of bark dust and physical assistance in spreading the bark on the grounds. The non-profit WFLC has operated as a day care facility for almost 50 years at its location next to the fire department at 1440 Newberg Highway, currently serving 46 youngsters. The Center is most appreciative of your generosity and help in beautifying our grounds.

Steve Arndt

WFLC Board Member

Woodburn

Cigarette tax is more about control than health

While I don't smoke and don't encourage others to, and also don't support anything that enslaves a being to harmful substances either of a physical nature or spiritual, I do recognize rope-a-dope when I see it.

The reasons that the Oregon legislature and more particularly, liberals, give for a $2 tax increase on a pack of cigarettes, is that it will serve as a deterrent to smokers/vapors while at the same time adding revenue to the Oregon State Health Plan that's needed to offset the high costs of taking care of those with poor health issues due to smoking.

One would wonder what the purpose was of Obamacare, which removed all that preexisting health conditions that our previous system imposed on folks in this category that chose their demise. Even with that put to the side, one must wonder why these legislators don't equally impose these increased taxes on sugars and candy, fatty foods, salt, beer and a host of other substances that lead to diabetes, obesity, cardiac conditions, emotional or mental conditions — substances that lead to at least as much health failure issues than that of smoking of cigarettes.

No, I think what this legislation is aimed at is very much a liberal socialist move, that is, one of control over a minority that doesn't have the ability to defend itself, and that's exactly why there is no legislation to impose unreasonable taxes on the host of other items that can and do harm our health, but that we all use daily.

To attempt to impose unreasonable sanctions on something everyone uses, isn't nearly as easy to accomplish as going after a minority. We call it bullying when we try to exercise physical or verbal dominion over others, so what should we call this?

John Catterson

Woodburn

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