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Angry viewers quickly took to social media platforms to share their outrage over her not only whining about something as average as being 6-foot-1

Netflix's original films are known for their gross glorification of the life of the average teenager, but did they finally cross a line with their newest film, "Tall Girl"? Reem Alharithi

The movie's purpose was to call attention to the adversity women face in society for not fitting certain standards of beauty by following the life of a tall teenage girl named Jodi who is constantly harassed for her height.

It even has the typical happy-ending of a Net-flix original, a dramatic moment of self-acceptance to teach young girls that the way to happiness is loving themselves.

So what's wrong with it?

The troubles started even before the movie itself came out.

Jodi introduces her vertical troubles in the trailer with this trademark line: "You think your life is hard? I'm a high school junior wearing size 13 Nikes. Men's Nikes. Beat that."

Oh, don't worry Jodi, Twitter will. Angry viewers quickly took to social media platforms to share their outrage over her not only whining about something as average as being 6-foot-1, but implying that it was comparable to the trauma minorities and the LGBTQ+ community face every day for their identities.

As if this isn't bad enough, she complains about her troubles to her African American best friend.

Netflix was begging for backlash with this one.

As a teenage girl struggling through unrealistic beauty standards, and a minority who has actually faced adversity in school for it, I have very conflicting opinions about this movie.

Since middle school, I have watched people dramatically make explosion sounds while pressing on the end of their pencil, or listened to people label Middle Easterners as terrorists, knowingly in my earshot.

I do not say this to undermine Jodi's struggles as a tall girl. I do want to make it clear that I am in no way undermining the struggles that teenage girls face, because in no way is that insignificant, nor is any type of struggle that a person goes through.

The problem with this movie was not that it was about the plight of a tall girl; the problem was having a pretty, white, affluent girl whining about her height and saying "beat that."

The bigger issue is that a lot of people can "beat that," and belittling them is cruel because their struggles aren't getting the same attention.

Reem Alharithi is a junior at West Linn High School.


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