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Jordan Scoggins is named the winner of the 2017 First Citizen Award by Rotary Club of Wilsonville

PHOTO: COREY BUCHANAN - With Scoggins' guidance, Inza R. Wood Middle School students run the Jr. Scoops organization, make and sell ice cream at 30 events throughout the year and to hundreds of residents in the community, and create marketing and business strategies. The Rotary Club of Wilsonville crowned Jr. Scoops founder Jordan Scoggins as the recipient of the 2017 First Citizen award — given each year to an admirable leader in the Wilsonville community — at the Heart of Gold celebration Saturday, March 3.

With Scoggins' guidance, Inza R. Wood Middle School students run the Jr. Scoops organization, make and sell ice cream at 30 events throughout the year and to hundreds of residents in the community, and create marketing and business strategies. Scoggins started Jr. Scoops seven years ago.

"He encourages students to take the reins of their projects, seeking professional counsel when they need it from him but doing all the work themselves," Wilsonville Rotary President Tim Crowley said at the Heart of Gold celebration. "The club's motto is 'Helping the community one scoop at a time.' Jordan provides important teaching and guidance to students, including how to write business plans, how to handle commercial food service equipment, the fundamentals of marketing, financial management and many other aspects of running a successful business. Thank you Jordan Scoggins."

Kathy Johnson, who has volunteered for Relay for Life and the Wilsonville Library; Angie Gibson, who has volunteered for Wilsonville schools and sports organizations; and Sue Woebkenberg, who leads the Wilsonville AARP tax assistance program, were also nominated for the First Citizen award.

In his acceptance speech, Scoggins thanked the people who helped turn Jr. Scoops from a creative idea into a full-fledged operation as well as his parents and family.

"I've always been on a quest to make my parents proud of me and this is one of those moments where I think I did and it makes me feel really good," Scoggins said.

"When you volunteer your time, you're taking that time away from your family. It's very simple. You can imagine seven years of giving up Saturday mornings, seven years of giving up Wednesdays after school and Thursday after school and meetings on Monday and Friday, constant emails and 30 events every year. It just takes a lot of time and you have to have somebody special at home. And I'm really lucky to have met my wife. She's special and I don't just say that."