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Captain Jeff Smith undergoes 10 weeks of intense training at Quantico. The program allows participants the opportunity to earn college credits through the University of Virginia for some of those studies. 

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office captain and former Wilsonville police chief Jeff Smith recently completed one of the toughest challenges available to local law enforcement officers: the FBI National Academy.COURTESY PHOTO: CCSO - Capt. Jeff Smith

Smith and two other Oregon law enforcement officers graduated from a 10-week training session at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia, on June 7.

Law enforcement officers must go through a highly competitive process to be selected for this honor. That includes a nomination by a supervisor; interviews with the candidate and co-workers to determine leadership skills and abilities; a background check; a determination of physical fitness; and the support of former National Academy graduates within the candidate's organization. 

Smith began his law enforcement career in 1995 with the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office as a deputy in the patrol division. The sheriff promoted him to patrol sergeant in 2004 and to deputy sergeant in 2008. He obtained the rank of patrol lieutenant in 2012.

In 2014, Smith served as the chief of police in Wilsonville as part of the contractual agreement between the city and the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office. He currently is a division commander at the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office. 

Smith earned a bachelor of science degree from the University of Oregon and his executive certificate from the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

During the 10 weeks of training, local executive-level law enforcement officers spend most of their time in the classroom. Smith's National Academy classes included: Advanced Psychology of Communication, Fitness in Law Enforcement, Psychology of Leadership, Emotional Intelligence, Managing the Law Enforcement Image, and a seminar in Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement. The program allows participants the opportunity to earn college credits through the University of Virginia for some of those studies. 


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